Tag Archives: novel

Love Your Library

Love Your Library: image by Kev Howlett (Eltham Library)

What is your relationship with the library? Do you have memories of the long ago dark days when you couldn’t talk and if you did you were scowled at by the librarian behind the desk, or worse, shushed?

How things have changed. Libraries are spectacular. At lease in Melbourne they are. Not only do they house thousands of yummy books but there are copious amounts of resources that you can use for free. Fabulous programs and offerings to whet your appetite for learning and entertainment.

Many libraries have done away with that giant desk that separated you and the librarian and have become wonderful modern spaces with computer areas and places for sitting in quiet contemplation.

Books are my passion, so it’s no surprise that libraries (and bookshops) fit with this obsession, but why am I writing about them?

Libraries should be part of your marketing mix when you publish your book. Have you even thought about them in this way? Library programs are full of author talks, writing festivals and programming around a huge variety of topics from mental health, digital technology, gardening and crafts.

If you go and visit, or go to your local library website, you’ll be able to see what their programs are like and if there is anything that might fit your book. Many of them follow standard public events like Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, Children’s Week, School Holiday programs.

The best thing that you can do is start forming relationships with libraries (and bookshops) in your local area. Make friends with the library staff. They are not obligated to promote your book or to buy it (library suppliers do that) but if they see that an event can be created around your book and that their patrons would enjoy it, they will be happy to help you. There’s no cost to you and quite often the event will be listed in their program.

This isn’t a ‘build it and they will come’ scenario but it’s a way of creating relationships within your community and building a reputation for yourself and your book. Once you have something set up in a program, you can then go and spruik in on social media, on your website and even the local paper. Any chance that you can get to be in front of people to tell them about your book, the better. There’s nothing better than word of mouth.

Here’s another reason to love your library. The staff know books! They are a wealth of knowledge when it comes to people’s reading habits and what is new on the market. They will also be able to tell you what kind of events attract a bigger crowd. Use this resource to help you find ways to get your book into reader’s hands.

When was the last time you entered a library? I dare you to visit one today!

If you’re struggling with your book marketing, come along to our Publish for Profit group each month.

Blaise the book chick

 

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Writing Starts with Questions?

Most writing starts with a question or a what if scenario.

What if we allow same-sex marriage?

What if you had three months to live?

What if you found out you had magical powers when you thought you were small, powerless and unwanted?

What would you do if you found out your partner was cheating on you?

As a writer, it’s your job to try to answer these questions. It’s through the writing that you will nut out the answers or solutions to a problem that your reader might have or the character in the story might have. You may not have all the answers but you can offer the reader some arguments, ideas or solutions that help them come to their own conclusion.

Readers are looking for something all the time. It might be that they feel lost or indecisive and these solutions can be presented in many ways through story. It doesn’t matter whether that story is fact or fiction because it’s the truth in the story that will make itself known. Even a simple love story has to be anchored in reality.

Truth? you say.

Yes, even fiction carries truth. In fact, without it the reader won’t connect with the story and will dismiss it very quickly.

Quite often the reader will already know the answer to their question but it’s from reading it in someone else’s words that helps to validate their own beliefs and ideas and cements a solution for them.

Here’s an example: We have been told through the ages that the ‘little guy’ can defeat the all powerful, that size doesn’t matter. These stories are played out in stories such as The Fellowship of the Ring, Harry Potter or countless biographies. The reader is looking for examples of how they might survive despite feeling like they have no choices, no power in their life.

Think about this when you’re writing. What is the truth that you are giving the reader? You have a lifetime of lived experience to share with your reader. They have questions, wants, and needs that they are looking for answers to.

 

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